Blog Posts

01 Sep 2016
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Part of a series of posts about common chronic illnesses and what happens when people cannot afford prescription medications to treat them.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 29.1 million people, or 9.3% of the U.S. population, have diabetes. Left untreated, diabetes can lead to unnecessary hospitalizations and death. While Diabetes ranks as the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S., many people with diabetes actually die from complications related to diabetes rather than the disease itself. In 2011, 85.3% of adults with diagnosed diabetes reported taking pills or insulin for their diabetes. But, the increasing cost of diabetes medications in the U.S. often leads patients to forgo or ration life-saving treatments.

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11 Aug 2016
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American consumers face skyrocketing out-of-pocket costs for their prescription medications. Senate Bill 2019 - The Preserve Access to Affordable Generics Act (S. 2019) would lower these costs by stopping the anticompetitive practice of “pay-for-delay” deals, also known as “reverse payment agreements.” These schemes enable brand-name pharmaceutical companies to pay-off potential generic competitors to postpone launching lower cost generic medications. The Federal Trade Commission has estimated that eliminating these agreements would save consumers about $3.5 billion a year. 

Pay-for-delay deals undermine the intent of the Hatch-Waxman Act, which was passed in 1984 to encourage generic drug companies to bring lower cost medications to market at the earliest – not the latest – point possible. A 2010 FTC report recommended that Congress pass legislation to protect consumers from such anticompetitive agreements. The FTC wrote: “a legislative solution offers the quickest and clearest way to deter these agreements and obtain the benefits of generic competitions form consumers. (more…)

29 Jul 2016
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The Medicare Drug Price Negotiation Act is the type of legislative reform that America needs to reduce our spiraling national prescription drug bill. Here’s why.

Medicare Parts B and D, together representing the nation’s largest prescription drug program, help cover drug costs for approximately 55 million people. While that population represents just a fraction of 1% of the world, their Medicare drug bill in 2014 was $143 billion or just under 15% of the world’s total pharmaceutical market of that year (about $1.06 trillion according to IMS Health). Even at that level of expenditure, millions of older Americans continue struggling to fill their prescriptions.

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19 Jul 2016
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A first in a series of posts about common chronic illnesses and what happens when people cannot afford prescription medications to treat them.

Asthma is a chronic lung disease very common in the United States and worldwide. The disease is characterized by a narrowing of the airways in the lungs that is treatable with various medications and avoiding environmental factors that trigger asthma attacks. When patients don’t take prescribed medications to treat their asthma the consequences can be deadly. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that in 2010 asthma accounted for 3,404 deaths, 439,400 hospitalizations, 1.8 million emergency room visits, and 14.2 million physician office visits. Drug costs are one of the main reasons people are not taking their asthma medications.

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08 Jul 2016
The Personal Drug Importation Fairness Act
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About four million Americans import medication for personal use each year because of high drug costs, according to the U.S. Centers of Disease Control and Prevention. Their actions, under most circumstances, are technically illegal, but not something over which the government prosecutes individuals. The law, however, is unjust and unfair and should be reformed so that people who buy medication from a pharmacy in a different country are not, technically, criminally liable. Think about it. The medication you take is 90% cheaper in a different country and you can’t afford it domestically. It’s available for import by mail from a licensed pharmacy that you can access on the Internet. Why should the act of importing it be illegal?

The Personal Drug Importation Fairness Act of 2015 (PDIFA), H.R. 2623, expressly legalizes the importation and Reimportation for personal use of medications. Its passage would make it expressly legal to order a medication online and have it imported for personal use or simply bring it back into the U.S. by car or plane. The bill was introduced by Congressman Keith Ellison in June of 2015, and is cosponsored by Congressman Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA), Congresswoman Janice Schakowsky (D-IL), Congresswoman Raul Grijalva (D-AZ), Congressman Alcee Hastings (D-FL), Congressman Jerrold Nadler (D-NY), Congressman Collin Peterson (D-MN), and Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro (D-CT).

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